What Are You Doing With Your Story?

Sometimes when things get tough and we are challenged, it is good to remember that God  will use our pain to help another person. Whether that person is currently going through something similar to what we have experienced now, or unbeknownst to us, in the future, it is comforting to know that we will or have helped another person a long the way.

That is one of the reasons why I love God so much because I have seen it not only in my life, through numerous testimonies and conversations people have shared with me . God, does not waste one single tear or miss one unheard cry…. He uses it all, all of them, to help another hurting soul. There is no way that I would have survived the loss of my brother fourteen years ago without the stories and heart to heart conversations people shared with me, not from a textbook, or something they saw on television, but true everyday people who mysteriously crossed my path, that helped me along the way in my journey. I think life is a journey, a conscious, ever-changing process that is always changing, where time never stands still. Even though a person will meet thousands of people, have millions of interactions with others, it is all one systematic process that comes full circle.  I read somewhere, “we come into the world naked with our fists bawled up, and leave this world naked with our fists bawled up!

28 And we know that God causes everything to work together[a] for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them. 29 For God knew his people in advance, and he chose them to become like his Son, so that his Son would be the firstborn[b] among many brothers and sisters. 30 And having chosen them, he called them to come to him. And having called them, he gave them right standing with himself. And having given them right standing, he gave them his glory. (Romans 8:28-30, NLT).

If you think about it, what would be the point of experiencing a trial in your life, if you thought there was no way out, nothing to believe in, and nobody to help? I know that there are some people who unfortunately believe that, I think as humans, we all can temporarily get caught up in that thinking, but it is nice to know there is a God. A real God that not to be clique,  will “make a way out of no way.” He really and truly does!

I can read research studies, and statistics about how people deal with life’s adversities, and that is good information to know, but I would rather have a friend put their hand on my shoulder and say, “Hey, I know, I have been there.” I do not believe there is any shame in sharing with others traumatic, tragic things that have happened to us in our lives. God warned us in His Word that trials would come to us.  What the real shame would be is when God brings you through something and you don’t share it with another person to help them along their way.

It is so amazing to know that we have a God that knows everything about us! From the number of hairs on our heads to our most inner being, he knows it all… I love Jeremiah 29:11-13,

 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. 12 Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. 13 You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

Whatever your story is, share it! My mother has a cousin named Karen Perry who lost her oldest son to a drug overdose. I am sure that some would have tried to cover up that their child got “caught up in life” and unfortunately lost his life at a very young age, but she didn’t. Karen took her pain to the world and to the schools, law enforcement agencies and now operates full-time NOPE Task Force, (Narcotic Overdose Prevention & Education) http://www.nopetaskforce.org.  NOPE is in the schools, law enforcement agencies, churches, community educating and preventing other parents from having to bury their children and other loved ones.

 

I ask myself daily, and I recommend you do the same, “What am I doing with my story?”

 

Blessings,

Traci

For more information on NOPE Task Force and drug education and prevention, please visit http://www.nopetaskforce.org

 

nope mission
nope mural

 

When Moving On Is Not Applicable In Grief!

If the Lord delights in a man’s way, he makes his steps firm; though he stumble, he will not fall, for the Lord upholds him with his hand.  Psalm 37:23-24

Have you ever lost someone you truly loved? Have you ever had to face the world without your loved one? Have you ever grieved so deeply that it hurt to the bone? It’s an unbearable pain, even physical when you do not even know if you can live another second , and the thought of going on without your loved one, makes it almost undesirable!  I have, I know what it is like! I also know that there is no way that you can possibly relate to someone who is grieving unless you have experienced the pain yourself.

How does one go on? How does one develop the stupid term of “a new normal”? You don’t, you simply learn to exist in a world that is not understanding of the depth of your pain; at least in the beginning. If I was told thirteen years ago when I lost my brother that things were going to get better, I wouldn’t have believed it. It does slowly get to a point where you can get up and function, then moves on to a point where you are able to have moments of joy in your life,  and maybe if your lucky, you will move to a point of living that is mixed with both joy and sorrow, but the point is your living. Don’t get me wrong, I will not lie to you there is always that sinking feeling of grief in your heart and soul, but it does get easier over time.

What do you say to someone who has just lost someone? How do you act around them? A lot of people have misconstrued notions with expectations when it comes to a grieving person, and although I do not have all the answers, I know what NOT to say.

Please do not say, Is there anything I can do for you? You know other than bring their loved one back to them, there is nothing you can possibly do for them, so it is best to just not say it. It is nice to say I am sorry for your loss. it is comforting to say that you will be there, and available to talk , even on the phone, when your friend or family member is lying awake at three am, missing their loved one. It is nice to continue to talk about their loved one. Saying their name aloud, keeping their memory alive. To a grieving person, the fear of forgetting their loved one is almost too much to bear.

It is amazing that others that are not grieving are afraid to talk about that person’s loved one for fear of bring up something that will cause pain in the grieved. It is the exact opposite, it is unbearable when people forget about the lost love one, and move on with their own lives, never bringing up the one who was lost. It is impossible for a person to move on with their lives. Although they keep living, they have never moved on, and never will.

The God of All Comfort

3 Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,8 the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, 4 who comforts us9 in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received from God. 5 For just as the sufferings of Christ flow over into our lives,10 so also through Christ our comfort overflows. 6 If we are distressed, it is for your comfort and salvation;11 if we are comforted, it is for your comfort, which produces in you patient endurance of the same sufferings we suffer.

The biggest mistake a person can make with another grieving person is to tell them it is time to move on!  The quickest way to cause pain and anger for a person, is to say the unimaginable thing of “moving on.”

When holidays come, please be sensitive to them and their feelings. Do not expect a person to celebrate and be joyful during those occasions. While it may be a joyous time for you, it is an extremely painful reminder of their loss. Be careful and sensitive to that person’s feelings, now is not the time to send them Christmas cards with pictures of your family inside the card.

Be willing to sit and listen to the person who grieves. Let them tell you for the hundredth time “Do you remember when…” stories about their loved one. Allow them to show you pictures, and except and be all right with their tears.

I know that there is reason for everything, and God is in control. It is okay to tell them that, but do not be insensitive to possible anger they may have with God over their loss. If God understands their anger, and mourns with them, than it should be expected for you to do the same. Just keep reminding them that you are sorry for their loss, without saying I understand, unless you truly do with your own loss.

Hugs,

Traci

 

Lesson’s Learned While Grieving

Grieving What I have learned Along the Way

  1. Initially everything is a “fog” because we are in disbelief or shock as to what just happened. It is my belief that this is God’s way of protecting us, because if we had to process all the information at one time, it would literally blow our minds.
  2. People move on in life around you, time doesn’t stand still even though you feel like it does for you. You may have emotions centered on other people you care about moving on with their lives, as well as people will expect you to “move on with your life” which can only be done when you are ready. Growth happens, you may not be aware of it initially, but you do process through grieving, and reminders are not necessary.
  3. In the beginning you will want to “save” everything, find a special place to put your loved one’s items, and do save them. You may not be ready to “deal” with them now, and that is okay, just set them aside so that they are there when you are ready.
  4. Initially, your focus is on the date of death, you will focus on the loss, what you were doing, what that person was doing; the “day and time” will be your central focus that is okay. Later on, you focus will shift from that day to days that you had celebrated together in the past, birthdays, Christmas, family traditions. When the time comes, the death date may not want to be your central focus, and that is okay, in fact, that is good, it represents growth.
  5. Remember your loved one’s “treasured items” may simply be that, something that brought them pleasure. You may find that it brings you pain, a sad reminder, and that it does not bring you joy in viewing. That is okay; simply understand to them it was treasured, and that you do not have the same feelings or recollection. Put the item aside in your “special box” and you can process it at a different time.
  6. Initially, your emotional pain is so raw, that it feels “to the bone”, and that you literally will die from a broken heart. You will always have a void, but time does change things, there will be a day when you can smile again. You just have to move through the process.
  7. Grieving is a process. It comes in stages that we all must go through. You may delay it, but you cannot avoid it, embracing the stages and move through them. You cannot go around grief; it will be waiting for you later if you do not process it.
  8. You may feel the need to re-create or re-construct you loved one’s final moments, especially if it is an accident. That is normal, and for some can give closure. It is completely up to the individual. (Medical records etc.)
  9. It is completely normal to “be mad at God” for what happened in fact, sometimes expected. It is okay, and it is a normal emotion. Talk it through and sort out your feelings.
  10. The best thing you can do is share you experience with others that understand exactly what you are experiencing. Find a support group, if you need to talk to someone professionally, which is a healthy step to take. Example, “Compassionate Friends” is a very good group for those who have lost children.
  11. It is completely NORMAL for you to want to talk about your loved one. Expect that after time, those around you will feel uncomfortable talking about it with you. They expect you to “move on, get over it”. The reason is THEY are uncomfortable talking about your loved one with you, because they cannot fix it for you. People who are grieving will always talk about their loved ones; it keeps them “alive” in our mind. People that have also experienced grieving will want to talk about them with you, and will want you to listen to them about their loved ones, that is why support groups are so important.
  12. Compassion is the greatest gift you can give someone, and is given to you through the experiences you go through in life.
  13. Early in your “journey” because that is what the process is, find a special place for your loved one’s pictures that brought you joy, display them, and put up special keepsakes with them. Remember there will be items; including photographs that will bring you pain (pictures of the casket, accident scene, etc). Sometimes it is best to put those things that are extremely painful, feel free to put those things away for a time being). You can always add and put away things as you feel necessary and ready.
  14. Know that God is Good. We may not understand why things happen the way that they do, but that He is always in control and has Mercy and Grace. One of the greatest things for me to realize was that my loved one was not in any pain, even though I would have thought he would have been, the human body has an amazing ability to protect you, with blocking pain.

What is This Thing Called Grief?

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“Grief is not what you expect, and its reality, is not something you could ever imagine.”  Judy Brizendine

“Grief is a demanding, confusing detour in life’s journey, but it is not the final destination. Your road does not end there. You are not alone, God loves you more than you can possibly imagine, and He’s looking for you, even if you’re not yet trying to find Him.”

“Journaling helps release everything bottled up tightly inside you. Sometimes talking about personal feelings is difficult, so writing helps you process these painful emotions and advances your healing.”

The best way out is always through~ Robert Frost.

“Unexpected death, instantly my entire world- and the way I related to it changed. Only those who have experienced the devastating loss of someone extremely close will understand. Only those who have faced first hand, the unbelievable depths of grief have the capacity to understand. And until my grief experience, I did not understand either. Incomprehensible, indescribable grief. Thus began an inescapable journey-one I did not expect nor certainly want. Yet this unwelcome journey has been a life-changing experience of wide-spread proportions- with changes that are still happening today, more than thirteen years later.”

“In spite of everything, I can tell you with absolute certainty there is hope, even during the darkest, seemingly most hopeless times of grief. I can tell you with confidence, that in time, your life can be rich, satisfying, and fulfilling in new ways because of your grief experience- if you allow it to be so. The choice is yours.

Grief is a process. It takes time, Remember; hope is still alive, even if you can’t see it yet. The only way to healing, is to go through the grief stages, you cannot avoid them, go around them, delay them, for if you do, and it will be sitting there waiting for you! It is unavoidable, but once you do, there is light on the other side. You do not have to do it alone there is always a person you come in contact with who has been through the same thing, that is how God works, yours never alone, and He is always there! (2 Corinthians 1;3-6)

What does Grief Look Like?

GRIEF– In the Beginning

  • an overwhelming, indescribable pain
  • all consuming
  • shocking and numbing to our senses
  • aloneness
  • a multitude of tangled emotions
  • an altered reality
  • heavy and exhausting
  • a total upheaval
  • an inward-focused look

GRIEF , as it Progresses is……

  • a disorderly process
  • a journey through unknown territory
  • unpredictable tears
  • ocean waves that crash suddenly upon us
  • an intense emotional pain and sadness
  • moments of sharp, unexpected anger
  • living life on “auto-pilot”
  • at times, completely draining- physically, emotionally, and spiritually
  • intermingled with fear, anxiety, and confusion
  • realization of shattered dreams

You may also experience…

  • hollowness
  • detachment, disconnection
  • a state of lost security and instability
  • difficulty concentrating, and making decisions
  • overly sensitive feelings
  • physical discomfort- tightness in chest, rapid heartbeat or skipped beats, sleep changes, changes in eating habits, nausea, and hyperactivity or complete exhaustion.

Along with grief comes…

  • the need to talk
  • the need to be heard
  • the need to know someone cares (really cares)

 

GRIEF- later on (could be years after the loss) may show up as…..

  • tears, especially when triggered by reminders
  • changes in feelings, thoughts and attitudes- “new perspectives”
  • changed identity and new roles
  • an ongoing, lengthy recovery that lasts much longer than we wish or think.
  • A re-mapping of life- a need to form new routines, interests, or relationships
  • A progression of letting go or “release”.
  • A new “normal” (whatever that is for you)

 

 

And then, perhaps…..

  • Refocused thinking and planning
  • A new examination of life, priorities, and faith
  • A greater awareness of other’s needs and hurts
  • A heightened sense of time’s finite nature
  • Renewal within yourself (if you choose)
  • New dreams for the future

 

GRIEF- possibilities, even later in the process, may include…

  • A desire to help others
  • A compassion for others
  • A greater comprehension of love
  • Personal growth
  • A stronger faith and desire to know God on a much deeper level.

“Grief is like a foreign language when we first confront it: awkward, unfamiliar, unwieldy, and overwhelming.”

“Making sense of the chaos of grief is a process of your own design carried out on your own timetable, along with certain people you choose to let you travel your path to healing. Take one step at a time, you’re so much stronger than you think. You can do this, and it is worth the price. Realize, no one can do it for you.”

You may also feel like you are all alone, but God promises you, He will NOT leave you! He is in control, and HE has good plans in store for you. Trust His Words, and hold tightly to His Promises!

I know what I am doing, I have it all planned out- plans to take care of you, not abandon you, plans to give you the future you hope for.  Jeremiah 29:11 (MSG)

All Credit goes to the author of the book listed below, Judy Brizendine could not have written it more beautifully, so all credit goes to her.  If she had written an article, I would have simply re-blogged the article.

Brizendine, Judy, “Stunned by Grief- Remapping your Life When Loss Changes Everything.”  Bennett Knepp Publishing, 2011.   Isbn: 978-0-9831688-1-2

 

 

The Things that Grief Has Taught Me.

Grieving What I have learned Along the Way

  1. Initially everything is a “fog” because we are in disbelief or shock as to what just happened. It is my belief that this is God’s way of protecting us, because if we had to process all the information at one time, it would literally blow our minds.
  2. People move on in life around you, time doesn’t stand still even though you feel like it does for you. You may have emotions centered on other people you care about moving on with their lives, as well as people will expect you to “move on with your life” which can only be done when you are ready. Growth happens, you may not be aware of it initially, but you do process through grieving, and reminders are not necessary.
  3. In the beginning you will want to “save” everything, find a special place to put your loved one’s items, and do save them. You may not be ready to “deal” with them now, and that is okay, just set them aside so that they are there when you are ready.
  4. Initially, your focus is on the date of death, you will focus on the loss, what you were doing, what that person was doing; the “day and time” will be your central focus that is okay. Later on, you focus will shift from that day to days that you had celebrated together in the past, birthdays, Christmas, family traditions. When the time comes, the death date may not want to be your central focus, and that is okay, in fact, that is good, it represents growth.
  5. Remember your loved one’s “treasured items” may simply be that, something that brought them pleasure. You may find that it brings you pain, a sad reminder, and that it does not bring you joy in viewing. That is okay; simply understand to them it was treasured, and that you do not have the same feelings or recollection. Put the item aside in your “special box” and you can process it at a different time.
  6. Initially, your emotional pain is so raw, that it feels “to the bone”, and that you literally will die from a broken heart. You will always have a void, but time does change things, there will be a day when you can smile again. You just have to move through the process.
  7. Grieving is a process. It comes in stages that we all must go through. You may delay it, but you cannot avoid it, embracing the stages and move through them. You cannot go around grief; it will be waiting for you later if you do not process it.
  8. You may feel the need to re-create or re-construct you loved one’s final moments, especially if it is an accident. That is normal, and for some can give closure. It is completely up to the individual. (Medical records etc.)
  9. It is completely normal to “be mad at God” for what happened in fact, sometimes expected. It is okay, and it is a normal emotion. Talk it through and sort out your feelings.
  10. The best thing you can do is share you experience with others that understand exactly what you are experiencing. Find a support group, if you need to talk to someone professionally, which is a healthy step to take. Example, “Compassionate Friends” is a very good group for those who have lost children.
  11. It is completely NORMAL for you to want to talk about your loved one. Expect that after time, those around you will feel uncomfortable talking about it with you. They expect you to “move on, get over it”. The reason is THEY are uncomfortable talking about your loved one with you, because they cannot fix it for you. People who are grieving will always talk about their loved ones; it keeps them “alive” in our mind. People that have also experienced grieving will want to talk about them with you, and will want you to listen to them about their loved ones, that is why support groups are so important.
  12. Compassion is the greatest gift you can give someone, and is given to you through the experiences you go through in life.
  13. Early in your “journey” because that is what the process is, find a special place for your loved one’s pictures that brought you joy, display them, and put up special keepsakes with them. Remember there will be items; including photographs that will bring you pain (pictures of the casket, accident scene, etc). Sometimes it is best to put those things that are extremely painful, feel free to put those things away for a time being). You can always add and put away things as you feel necessary and ready.
  14. Know that God is Good. We may not understand why things happen the way that they do, but that He is always in control and has Mercy and Grace. One of the greatest things for me to realize was that my loved one was not in any pain, even though I would have thought he would have been, the human body has an amazing ability to protect you, with blocking pain.

Do You Think You Would Have This Much Strength?

I often write about people that are in my life who made a tremendous impact in my thoughts or the way that I view life. I have a friend who I met a few years ago when her little girl had cancer. Emily was about four years old and had just recently finished all her treatments, I am happy to say that she is in remission to this day. Monica, the mother a few years later had another little boy named Eric who is now six years old. When Eric was two years old they also found cancer, only he is still battling it and it is a stage four. To catch you up to date on this wonderful mom, she was married to their father but he sadly passed away last year at a very young age of a seizure. It is odd and bizarre, and very unexpected of Eric Sr.’s death, I believe he was in his early or mid thirties when he died.  Little Eric is still in the children’s hospital and the last update that I received from Monica was that he was going to be transferred to another hospital, in hopes that he receives a transplant to save his life. After suffering the loss of my brother twelve years ago, I simply am in awe of Monica’s strength and perseverance. To be honest, what choice does she have, she is alone, and has a total of five children to care after, but one must wonder how and when she does it all. To make matters worse, Monica’s In-laws are in constant battle with her, and are not sadly, very supportive of her.

A few years ago I had Emily in one of my classes at school, and I remember that it was right after her chemo therapy that she would come to school, and the poor child would be completely wiped out! It was exhausting for her little body, and I remember one time carrying her to her school bus at the end of the day so she could go home. Her mom tired so hard for little Emily to continue on, doing what “other kids did, making her life as normal as possible.”

Now Monica battles it again, only this time alone! In a recent posting on Facebook, she wrote that she was explaining to Eric that they would be moving to another hospital in hopes that he would get better. Monica stated that little Eric responded with , “I am never going to get better. Why did Emily get better and not me?” This breaks my heart, what do you say to your child when they ask you that question?  She continued on in her post, that she had recently read to him, “Heaven is For Real”. This absolutely broke my heart, why she asks, “Am I reading this book to my six year old?” Eric’s response was that he would see daddy again.

 

I pray for Monica and her kids, I am a Christian, and I know that God certainly is in control and has a purpose in all of this. I am thankful that we have a God who understands questions like, “God, how much do you think one person can take?”. I know the grief, and I can only imagine her struggles. I ask you to pray for her and her family. I do not know what God has in store for this family. I am praying that little Eric is healed, and goes on to have a normal life. I am praying for strength for Monica, and healing for her family. Her other children are probably middle school age now. Please join me in prayer and holding this family close to your heart. I do not believe she is working, I do not know how she possibly could really, hold down a job in addition to all of this. She has an account on http://www.gofundme.com  (or something like that) Imagethat people donate to her, but other than that I simply do not know. So again, join me in prayer for her financial stability as well.

 

Letting Go…..



 
 
     This I believe is the most personal thing I have read to date. This is me to the T… I have been so afraid that something would happen to my little boy that it has paralyzed me and in turn paralyzed him. It is so bad, that I don’t even like him to go outside to play. (I think crazy thoughts like he will get hit by a car, etc.) when I know I have no control over what happens to him. Its a form of

Idolatry that I am guilty of. This morning God had a talk with me, and I through tears released him back to God for he was His to begin with. I know this stems from my mom losing her son, and me watching it nearly destroy her. Sorry this is so long but in Jesus Calling touched my heart this morning, like it was written for me so here it is:

      “Entrust your loved ones to me; release them into My protective care. They are much safer with Me than in your clinging hands. If you let a loved one become an idol your heart, you endanger that one-as well as yourself. Remember the extreme measures I used with Abraham and Isaac. I took Isaac to the very point of death to free Abraham from son-worshiping. Both Abraham and Isaac suffered terribly because of the father’s undisciplined emotions. I detest idolatry, even in the form of parental love. When you release loved ones to Me, you are free to cling to My hand. As you entrust others into My care, I am free to shower blessings on them. My Presence will go with them wherever they go, and I will give them rest. This same Presence stays with you, as you relax and place your trust in Me, Watch to see what I will do.” Jesus Calling

 
 

Eternity…

I was readying an article about Eternity and it talked about, “needing to get serious about our eternity.” We are only here for a short time, and although it may seem like a long time, it is only a fraction of our actual life span if you include the time you will spend in Heaven. Eternally!

To talk about how we spend our time on earth, we are often busy and hurried, spending little time with the small things that amount to a whole lot! We are often rushed, over-extended in our activities, and spend little actual quality time with those that we love! Why is that? This is the time we need to be building up our loved ones, ensuring that you have told them and prepared them as much as possible for their eternity, their salvation. Are your children saved? Have they been baptized? Have they given their life to Jesus? These are the things we are to do, much more important than band or soccer practice!

Charles Stanley said it best, ” Millions of people know nothing about Jesus, and we’re the ones God has commanded to take the message to them. Both corporately as the church and individually in our spheres of influence, we have the responsibility, to go and make disciples of all nations. (Matt 28:19).”

God said we are the light of the world (Matthew 5:14).  “When light enters the room, it drives out darkness.” We are also the salt of the earth. (Matt 5:13). “Salt adds flavor and preserves food from corruption.” Some will want what you have because they will see and feel the love, joy and peace in your world, and then there will be others who are like salt to a wound. However they respond, you keep spreading the message, God will let you know when to stop. (When you are with Him, in Eternity.)

We are to be teachers, teaching others to observe all that He commands. (Matt 28:20). “We often focus on getting people through the door of salvation, then leave them standing alone on the threshold.” After accepting Christ, the real teaching begins, teaching them the truths and ways of God.

We are also to warn others of the consequences of having a life without Jesus. Their eternal destiny is at stake! Ask the Holy Spirit to guide you, and He will show you the way! We do have a tremendous responsibility to share the Word with others, it is not hard, and so worth it, after all, didn’t Jesus die for you to have the ability to do so?

Peace,
Traci

Do You Fear Dying?

This was on my mind today, and I thought about it. Do you have an unnatural fear about dying? I think about it more now that I am getting older, most certainly. I don’t think that my thoughts are unnatural, for we all come to terms that death is a natural part of life. I think more along the lines of how it will affect the lives of those left behind. Dying is the easy part. Sometimes my thoughts about something happening to one of my kids could be alittle out there, I think, after losing my brother at such an early age, compounded with my fear of “not trusting this crazy world”.  I don’t know what else to say about that one, I can take that one over to the OCD level. I have to be careful with that one. The Bible tells us not to fear death, and I know the end result of the journey is worth it. We are not of this world, or from this world, so we don’t expect to stay in this world.

I guess I have always been that way with my children. I have only meant to protect them and shelter them. Having grown up with a family of law enforcement, reality about the dangers of this world were real! Real stories,. real victims, real crime scenes… something you don’t easily forget. It doesn’t help either when you are street smart, and know what time it is.

I need to give this to God, I can’t control it, and I can take responsibility for my role in this scenario. I can continuously pray for their safety, wisdom, strength and guidance, and above all else, the Intelligence to know to whom to go to when the troubles come, God…. for they are coming.

One of the greatest gifts that I was ever told that  is this, “We as Christians have the power given to us by Jesus Christ our Lord to command the enemy to flee from us! He must flee! Oh trust me, He will be back, but you have that power!

Penny for your thoughts.
Peace

Life is Painful Sometimes!

I think whole-heartenly the worst pain that a mom bears, other than Child birth… is watching your child experience a broken heart! The absolute worst feeling in the world, the experience in which you receive the most growth, and the best opportunity to pull closer to HIM!

I remember mine on a high school level, and then again, several times as an adult! Something you never forget! I always ask myself, and have asked my kids, “What did you learn from this, and how will it make you stronger?  Life always teaches you lessons with each experience that it brings you…. the key is…. and I didn’t realize this until a few go-a- rounds in life, is what it shows you,  from repeating the lesson over again!

I think God is all his Glory, has a sense of humor in all of this as well. I don’t know about you, but I remember (looking back now it’s funny) the silliness of my “first love.” I was convinced, at that particular time, that Life as I knew it was over after my first dramatic break-up.  My son and I laugh about it now, or should I say I still tease him, about how he was convinced his eighth grade love was the one for life!

How many of you remember your first love? First heart break? What did you learn from it?