Activist and writer Michael Harrington (1928–1989) published The Other
America: Poverty in the United States in 1962. Read by President Kennedy and
many others, this highly influential book argued that despite America’s
apparent postwar prosperity, tens of millions of Americans were stuck in
desperate poverty. The Other America spurred many of the domestic policy
initiatives undertaken by the federal government in the 1960s, known as the  “War on Poverty.”

In April 1964 president Lyndon Johnson traveled to Martin County, Kentucky, in the heart of Appalachia to launch the nation’s War on Poverty. Within a year—with passage of the Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965 (ARDA)—Appalachia was designated as a special economic zone. The act created a federal and state partnership known as the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), whose mission is to expand the economic opportunities of the area’s residents by increasing job opportunities, human capital, and transportation.

Over $23 billion had been spent on the region through the auspices of ARDA; roughly half of the funds were from ARC and the remainder were from other federal, state, and local programs. Most of which seemed to have been spent on initiating support for the people in their current time, but little was allocated for future education of the next generation or small business entrepreneurship. Another issue was that there was very little funding allocated for the schools and vocational programs..

 Now that we are in the Information age,  the problem with the region today is that because very little was done to educate the children of the five generations that followed the initiation of the ARDA. The region and people are not considered advantageous in soliciting businesses and companies to move to the area.

What are your thoughts on this issue? Do you believe that more could have been done to help the people of the Appalachian?

My opinion is that America is much to wealthy of a country to have the poverty and homelessness problems that we do. We need to take care of our own, and fix what is broken internally, not only physically, but mentally and Spiritually as a Nation.

Reference:

ARC (Appalachian Regional Commission). 2009. Performance and Accountability Report
(www.arc.gov/publications/FY2009PerformanceandAccountabilityReport.asp).
Autor, David, Lawrence Katz, and Melissa Kearney. 2006. “The Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market.” American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings 96, no. 2: 189–94.

Billings, Dwight, and Kathleen Blee. 2000. The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and
Hardship in Appalachia. Cambridge University Press

Caudill, Harry. 1963. Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area. New York: Little, Brown.

Harrington, Michael. 1962. The Other America. New York: Scribner

Bowlingtown, Kentucky–A Lost Communiy, but not Forgtten

Interesting article on Bowlingtown, I never noticed that my blog was used as an original source for her article.

Our Unbounded Heritage: 12th Century & Beyond

This post tells the story of the Bowling’s/Boling’s and Bowlingtown– a story as viewed by ancestors and living relatives; it includes a famous colonizer; a single woman’s efforts to keep Bowlingtown and its families on the map and in our memories; and, a local newspaper’s documentary about them all.

A Brief History

Daniel Boone, the Great American Pioneer, used his daring, wood-craft, and “wilderness scout” skills and experiences to open up the landscape and colonize Kentucky for his family and other settlers that founded Bowlingtown like the Bowling, Boling,  Barger, Begley, Combs, Duff, Hacker, Rice, and West families.

Bowlingtown was a thriving community of hundreds that once prospered where Buckhorn Lake state park now stands. After several years efforts (1995-1999), by Jewell Gordon, one of the last residents’ of Bowlingtown, a plaque now appears at the front of the Buckhorn Lodge that reads:

Bowlingtown 1800 -1960:

Long before Buckhorn…

View original post 1,756 more words

Excellant Websites for Your Research

Here are a few of my favorite websites that I have used during my research.
Clay County Genealogical Society
 
Kentucky Old Cooking Facebook Group
 
Technology for Genealogy
 
The Mayflower Societies
 
Francis Cooke Society (PilCumgrim)
 
Pilgrim Hall Museum
 
Orleans Indiana Facebook Group- If you Grew Up In Orleans
 
Cumberland Gap Genetic  Genealogy Facebook Group
 
 
Melungeons Facebook Group
 
Bolling, Bowling Facebook Group
 
 
TriState Genealogy Group Ohio-Indiana-KY- Facebook
 
Pennsylvania Genealogy- Facebook
 
Genealogy and Newspapers- Facebook
 
Southeastern Ky History, Genealogy and Cemeteries- Facebook
 
 
The Clay County Genealogical and Historical Society- facebook
 
Wilkes Genealogical Society (official) facebook (North Carolina)
 
Breathitt Memories- Facebook Kentucky group
 
Jackson County Ky Facebook group
 
Melungeons Unite Facebook group
 
Kentucky Genealogy Network Facebook
 
Tall Tales and Folklore’s of Kentucky’s History
 
Families from Breathitt County Ky Facebook
 
Clay County  History and Genealogy
 
 
Breathitt County History
 
Owsley County Ky Genealogy Facebook
 
Descendants of the LongHunters Facebook
 
Melungeon and Proud of It Facebook Group
 
Cortland Cemetary Ky Facebook
 
Pike County Ky History Facebook
 
East Ky facts, Legends Facebook
 
Lineage Society of America  Facebook
 
Ohio History and Genealogy Facebook
 
Southeast Kentucky Genealogy
 
North Carolina Genealogy
 
The Mayflower Society facebook
 
Newspapers- The Ancestor Hunt website
 
Jackson County Ky Rootsweb Website
 
Rootsweb Resource Page
 
Chronicling  America Newspapers Website
 
Cincinnati Ohio Museum Center
 
Library of Congress
 
The Great Migration- Pilgrims
 
American Ancestors
 
 
Newspaper Abstracts
 
The Olden Times Newspapers
3333
Kindred Trails
 
Access Genealogy- Free Site
 
Genealogy Today- Google for Ancestry
 
National Archives
 
Us Genweb
 
World Genweb
 
Family History Daily
 
Census.gov
 
Find A Grave
 
 Cyndi’s List- Resource
 
Family Tree Maker Magazine
 
Fold 3- Newspapers
 
Bureau of Land Management
 
DAR
 
Digital Public Library of America
 
Steven Morse- many sites ( Ellis Island)
 
State Websites-Individual states
 
Census Tools
 
Williamsburg Library Genealogy
 
Library of Virginia
 
Family Search- death certificate
 
Moutain Laurel
 
 
Old Cade Coves-Kentucky pictures
 
Appalachian Mixed Blood-Melungeon Blog
 
  
Melungeon s Blog-Hancock Tenn
 
Bowling, Bolling Website at Blogger-Original
 
Colonial Records of North Carolina
 
 
United States Marriage Records-Definitions
 
The Cumberland Gap Blog
 
The History Channel
 
Kentucky Library
 
Kentucky~ Kindred Trails
 
Kentucky Dept of Library e Archives